Archive for the ‘Finances’ Category

life-wheelHaving been involved with the ‘networking’ industry for a couple years now, I completely understand why it has been so hard to find others who wanted to get ahead in their life using this model.  When I approached others at first, I never understood why they were so scared of what I was showing them. ‘Networking’ is like a swear word in some circles.

Then I started to hear about other companies out there, that brought to mind images of pyramids and scams. for some of them, even I thought they might very well be scams when you consider the cost to get involved and the high price of the products. Then there is the way some of them are structured, where the person at the top makes all the money, making it an illegal pyramid. And there are those where you make money for signing people up and not actually doing anything productive. I must say I’m glad I wasn’t introduced to one of these first, or I may have been doomed to mediocrity, not looking past the companies that give this industry a bad name.

I just didn’t see their point of view at first due to Life Leadership being so different. They were still seeing the Ford Pinto which might explode, when I was trying to show them a new Lamborghini. It’s like they thought all cars were bad because that old model was bad, when in fact there are some pretty nice ones out there too.

I’ve been wanting to do a post on this for a while to address these thoughts, but then Chris Brady did one that is certainly much better written than I could have done (He does have the advantage of being a best selling author)

He talks about what LIFE has done to address all the negatives, and what they did to fix the industry. I see LIFE doing to networking, what McDonald’s did to franchising. When franchising was almost voted to be illegal due to the way the industry worked, McDonalds changed it to being one of the most successful industries in the world.

What LIFE did is take everything that was seen as being wrong with networking and threw it out the window, keeping all that was right. Consider that unlike any other company out there, LIFE doesn’t keep any profits; there is no owners cut. Because of that, prices don’t have to be inflated to pay both the owners and the members. In fact the prices are reduced to keep it affordable to the masses, instead of catering to the classes. ALL the profits goes to the members!

Here is what Chris had to say: (more…)

Entrepreneur

A comment made on my Rascal Manifesto post led me to find a few other gems out there, and I just had to share them as well. Here is the first: I am an Entrepreneur Manifesto – and it’s available to purchase as a poster at lifemanifestos.com

I just finished reading Freedom Shift by Oliver DeMille, and the book is fantastic!

In this book, DeMille puts forth his 3 choices to reclaim our freedoms. Although written from the American perspective, the ideas he lays out can, and should, be applied to every country.

We can have an entrepreneurial revolution, a rise of the independents, or developing and leading new tribes. We are not limited to one choice however, and should endeavor to choose all 3.

DeMille starts off his book by going through the producer vs employee society, and explains how producers are more inclined to promote freedom than a society of dependents. Employees are dependents because everything they do or have is dependent on what their employer gives them, and so can’t truly do anything on their own.

Public schools these days don’t really teach students to be leaders or entrepreneurs, and that is exactly what this world needs if we are to reclaim the freedoms that are constantly being taken away by our governments. Public schools teach people how to be employees, keeping the low and middle class citizens in the low and middle class. Our schools don’t teach us how to get out of those classes, as employees are not meant to. entrepreneurs work for their own dream, while employees work for someone else’s. What our schools teach is remembering names and date and formulas, with very little meaning being brought to any of it. For example, when I was in high school, I remember learning stuff about history, but what it was about those times that made it important. What I learned (when I could remember) were names and dates of different events and people, that was quickly lost after the tests were written. I had gained no understanding or meaning from those people or events.
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While reading “Developing the Leader Within You” by John Maxwell, I was intrigued by the chapter dealing with problem solving. As I was going through it, it reminded me of what should be done to solve the problems with the economy and how what is now being done goes against these key principles. What stood out first for me was the first step:

IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM

John Maxwell writes:

‘Too many times we attack the symptoms, not the cause. Ordering your staff to stay at their desks until quitting time is a Band-Aid solution that does not answer the question, “Why does the staff leave early?” Your job is to identify the real issues that lie beneath the symptoms.’

This can be applied to many different areas. The first thing that came to mind when reading was this is relatable to what many are saying about the growing income inequality, and the rich needing to be taxed more. But are they really identifying the problem, or just a bad symptom of the real problem? Will the solution really fix what’s wrong? I would say the poor being poor is the problem, and if the rich being taxed more brings them down closer to the level of poverty, will they now be better off? Why do people just point to the gap and say ‘BAD’? Why don’t they ask “What is causing the gap to occur?” The taxing the rich idea is just a band-aid solution that does nothing to stop the gap from occurring in the first place. I won’t go into all the nasty effects that solution would have on the economy in general, or the poor, in particular in this post.
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When I see surveys done asking if a government program should be funded, I see the question asked and the results to go along with it, and wonder how accurate it truly is. I don’t mean in statistical terms with the margin of error, but in terms of the question being asked, and what question is actually being answered.

It also makes me wonder what are the motives of the people asking the question, and are they looking to get a certain answer? do they themselves truly understand the question being asked, and understand how the public will respond to the wording of the question?

I read an article not long ago about the conservative government planning to cut funding to the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation), and when I read the part about a survey asking the public if it should be funded, I thought the question a little misleading. For someone who understands economics it is clear enough. However it is my experience that most people don’t care about the subject and many outright despise even thinking about economics. If you don’t truly understand the question, you will end up giving an answer based on your understanding and not on the truth of what is really being asked. Does this make sense to you?

Before you comment or send me messages about how the CBC is an institution that should be funded and I’m wrong for thinking otherwise, understand that I’m not saying one way or the other whether it should be (at least not in this post), as that is beside the point.

The point I’m bringing up concerns all surveys of this kind, whichever side your on.
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During my study of Austrian Economics, it has become very clear how government spending is bad economics. However, when I engaged in conversation with someone on the issue, it has always been difficult to have them understand the rational behind the school when they have not themselves studied the work of the Austrian school. This all changed the other day when I found a simple way that is easy for everyone to understand.

To really understand why taxes are bad, I believe it is important to understand how money is spent. I was listening to a CD about freedom called ‘Freedom Isn’t Free‘, in which Bob McEwan (6 term member of the US congress) was giving a speech. Based on everything I’ve read and heard, I’m going to share that information along with some of my own thoughts.

When you spend your own money on your behalf, you care about two things; the price and the quality. Nobody can make that decision for you as good as you can. Let’s take the example of bananas. When you stand looking at the bananas in the market, you look at the price and make a judgement on how long they are going to last. You also consider if perhaps you will have the nephews and nieces over this weekend because they might go bad.  Not only are you considering the price (you are probably buying them here because this store has cheaper bananas, or it’s cheaper than spending gas to drive further for them) but also the quality. You want to buy the banana’s that will bring you the most satisfaction – like not going bad before they are eaten.

It’s also important to remember here the subjective value theory. It basically says that people value things in different ways, and it is impossible for an exchange to be equal between two persons. For an exchange to be made, person A who has item X must value item Y possessed by person B more than he values item X. On top of this, person B must value item X more than item Y. If A & B gave the same value to the items, there would be no exchange as at least one of them was not gaining anything. In the example above, the buyer of the bananas values those particular bananas more than the money he would be spending.

So when you spend the money on yourself, you spend it at its peak value and, again, no one can spend it like you can. You decide whether you need the shoes, the clothes, etc. This is 1st party spending; something for you, using your money.
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