Posts Tagged ‘economics’

During my study of Austrian Economics, it has become very clear how government spending is bad economics. However, when I engaged in conversation with someone on the issue, it has always been difficult to have them understand the rational behind the school when they have not themselves studied the work of the Austrian school. This all changed the other day when I found a simple way that is easy for everyone to understand.

To really understand why taxes are bad, I believe it is important to understand how money is spent. I was listening to a CD about freedom called ‘Freedom Isn’t Free‘, in which Bob McEwan (6 term member of the US congress) was giving a speech. Based on everything I’ve read and heard, I’m going to share that information along with some of my own thoughts.

When you spend your own money on your behalf, you care about two things; the price and the quality. Nobody can make that decision for you as good as you can. Let’s take the example of bananas. When you stand looking at the bananas in the market, you look at the price and make a judgement on how long they are going to last. You also consider if perhaps you will have the nephews and nieces over this weekend because they might go bad.  Not only are you considering the price (you are probably buying them here because this store has cheaper bananas, or it’s cheaper than spending gas to drive further for them) but also the quality. You want to buy the banana’s that will bring you the most satisfaction – like not going bad before they are eaten.

It’s also important to remember here the subjective value theory. It basically says that people value things in different ways, and it is impossible for an exchange to be equal between two persons. For an exchange to be made, person A who has item X must value item Y possessed by person B more than he values item X. On top of this, person B must value item X more than item Y. If A & B gave the same value to the items, there would be no exchange as at least one of them was not gaining anything. In the example above, the buyer of the bananas values those particular bananas more than the money he would be spending.

So when you spend the money on yourself, you spend it at its peak value and, again, no one can spend it like you can. You decide whether you need the shoes, the clothes, etc. This is 1st party spending; something for you, using your money.
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